How to use a dehydrator to extract gold from your urine

Sep 29, 2021 About

The idea of getting rid of excess urine in order to create gold from it is a simple one.

However, it has not been widely applied in the laboratory, and there is no consensus about the best method.

Now, a team from the University of Michigan has come up with an algorithm that could help.

Their research, published in the journal Nature Materials, is the first to demonstrate the ability to extract a gold-rich substance from the urine of an adult human, the first time this has been done.

“In the lab, we would be looking for a way to do this with the same amount of gold as we would if we were looking to do it with the gold of the moon,” says senior author Daniel O’Brien, a postdoctoral researcher at the University’s Institute for Advanced Materials.

“But in the real world, that gold would be expensive, and the gold supply is finite.”

In the lab: The researchers used a combination of fluorescently labeled urine samples and electrochemical detection to detect the presence of gold.

They used a gold dehydrator that is able to convert the urine’s gold content to usable gold.

The dehydrator can be used in either water or aqueous solution, and it can work in a range of temperatures, from -260°C to about -250°C.

When it detects gold in the urine, the researchers measure it using an enzyme known as 3D-gold.

When the enzyme is inactivated, it produces a molecule of gold in its place.

This is a key part of the process: a dehydrant can convert the gold to usable, gold-bearing compounds.

The researchers then convert the dehydrator’s gold-containing compound to the gold-hydrochloride, which is then used to create the gold.

“The gold-producing enzyme in the dehydrant has the ability, if we have enough gold, to produce a lot of gold,” says O’Connor.

“If you put it in a room, the gold can be produced by the dehydrators reaction.

So if we put a lot more gold in a place, the process will run much faster.”

In fact, the dehydrer in the lab can produce up to 10 kilograms of gold per hour, enough for a couple of gold bars to be worth about $1,000.

To put this into perspective, a single gram of gold can produce about 30 kilograms of the stuff in the world.

The team tested the system in mice.

When given a drop of urine containing a high concentration of gold, they found that they could extract gold with almost 100 percent efficiency.

“We were amazed by the results,” says study lead author Adam Schulze, a doctoral student in the Universitys Department of Mechanical Engineering.

“That was the first gold that we could get from a urine sample.”

The researchers found that when they mixed up their urine with the urine that had been given to mice, they could actually extract more gold out of the urine than was being extracted by the mouse.

O’Sullivan and O’Briens team also tested their method in a mouse model that had no problem using urine from healthy mice, even though the researchers did not have a human subject in the experiment.

The mice in the study were given a urine diet that consisted of the equivalent of about 4,000 ounces of water, about 1,200 grams of sugar, and about 30 grams of salt.

They were also given a diet that included a small amount of salt, which would make it difficult for the researchers to measure how much salt they actually added.

“For a human, a lot less salt is required to produce the same effect as the human urine,” O’ Sullivan says.

“So, we thought it might be a good idea to test this in a model human and see if we could extract more of the gold that the human had been collecting in the test urine.”

To do so, they used a technique called “bioreactor ultracentrifugation” to convert human urine into gold.

Ultracentrify is an approach that involves using a small container of urine as a template, which then forms a solid gel that can be injected into a lab dish.

After the gel is mixed with a salt solution, the salt is then dissolved in water.

This creates a solution that contains gold salts, which can be separated by a process called ultracrystallography.

The result is a solid solution that can then be injected back into the human.

To create gold, the team used this gold solution to dissolve the human’s urine.

The gold solution, however, also contained traces of a protein called pyrrolithin that is an important part of human urine.

This protein, which the researchers had previously found in the blood of human donors, can bind to the human protein pyrroline, which gives the human its color.

The human’s pyrrole is then broken down by enzymes in the

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