Tag: equipo vision

Climbing equipment operator fined $300 for $300+ worth of gear

In a case that illustrates the potential consequences of the recent crackdown on personal protective equipment, a California man is suing a company that manufactures climbing equipment for personal protective purposes, according to local media reports.

The man, who has not been named in the media reports, is seeking more than $300,000 in damages for damages he suffered as a result of being injured while trying to climb on his own in a storm in March.

The incident took place near the Yosemite Valley in the Sonoma County town of Ponderosa.

According to the Los Angeles Times, the man and his friend were attempting to climb a 1,800-foot wall of rocks at about 4:30 p.m. on March 7, 2016.

The climber’s climbing gear caught fire when he landed on the wall.

The Associated Press reports that the climbing gear was purchased by the company Climax, Inc. in May 2016.

Climax is owned by Caterpillar Inc., which is headquartered in Scottsdale, Arizona.

According a Caterpillar press release, the company has been engaged in business activities since the mid-1990s and has been in continuous operation since its inception in 2001.

In a statement, Caterpillar said that the company “cannot comment on individual litigation claims.”

The Associated Statesman-Review reported that the suit was filed against Caterpillar on Monday, and that the defendant was not named in any of the media outlets reporting the story.

“This case is a direct result of Caterpillar’s continuing failure to provide adequate, safe and effective safety and training for its employees and customers,” Caterpillar wrote in a statement.

“The lawsuit seeks compensatory damages and punitive damages for the damage and injury suffered by the Climax employee.”

It is unclear if the suit has merit.

According the AP, the Climaxis company did not immediately respond to Ars’ request for comment.

A recent investigation into the use of personal protective gear at Walt Disney World revealed that many of the equipment companies involved in the industry use subcontractors with the Department of Homeland Security and other federal agencies to produce equipment for use in disaster preparedness, security, and response.

The AP reports that in a recent investigation, the department revealed that some companies with federal contracts for emergency response equipment “often have subcontractors that produce the equipment themselves and that they don’t disclose that fact to the government, which has oversight of the contracts.”

The AP also reported that one of the contractors who had been in charge of a training facility for Disney employees at Walt Walt Disney Imagineering’s Florida location told a local ABC affiliate that his company was providing the equipment to other companies.

The company that produced the equipment did not respond to a request for additional comment from Ars.