Tag: playground equipment

‘Dismantle’ a coal-fired power plant that’s been killing workers

The dismantling of a coal power plant in Pennsylvania could cost $5 billion and take years, and it’s not likely to happen soon, officials said Monday.

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection has until Sept. 5 to decide whether to grant a request by the American Coal Association to temporarily stop operations of the Morristown Power Plant, a project that began in the late 1990s but hasn’t been able to generate electricity since 2011 because of the plant’s burning of coal.

The agency will likely grant the request to take effect Sept. 15, but officials said the delay will not affect the agency’s decision to begin the process to shutter the plant.

The plant is the only coal-burning power plant of its kind in the country, according to the Pennsylvania Department.

The state estimates the shutdown will save $5.6 billion.

The cost includes the cost of the shutdown and other benefits, including $3 billion for the cost-sharing payments to the coal industry, the department said in a statement.

The PADEP is scheduled to make a final decision on the shutdown on Oct. 31.

It has until then to submit a report to the legislature, which will then determine whether the power plant should be shut down.

The plant’s operator, Murray Energy, has said it can’t survive without power.

It recently agreed to pay $4.3 billion to buy power from other sources in exchange for a state commitment to keep the plant open.

The Pennsylvania legislature in 2017 passed legislation to reduce pollution and pollution from power plants, but that bill was vetoed by Gov.

Tom Wolf.

Wolf has said he’s not worried about the shutdown.

But he has called on Pennsylvania to get back to the “source-based” electricity system that has been proven effective, including solar and wind power, that can generate enough electricity to power nearly 70 percent of the state’s electricity needs.

The coal plant has been cited as one of the most environmentally harmful in the United States.

The Associated Press reported in 2017 that nearly 30,000 tons of toxic sludge was dumped at the plant every day, mostly into a river that flows through the town of Morriston.

The Associated Press

‘I’m going to take the stairs’: Woman takes her first step in life

At age four, Maribel Ponce de Leon became the first Hispanic child to graduate from high school in the United States.

She earned her Bachelor of Arts in English from St. Mary’s College in South Bend, Indiana.

But, like so many others, her life was cut short after the birth of her son.

“My dad said he had to take his own life because he was afraid to die,” she told ABC News.

“I’m just a mom.

I’m not a celebrity.

I didn’t get to go to the Oscars or any other awards, and I had no chance to go see my kids.”

As a child, Ponce, who now lives in Miami, worked as a waitress at restaurants.

Her husband, Juan Carlos, took her to schools in Miami and Puerto Rico to study.

“I was the only one who had the confidence to go and work in the school system,” Ponce said.

Ponce’s father, Juan Pablo, told ABC affiliate WPLG that the school she attended was “full of problems” and “totally out of control.”

“We were getting students who were not qualified,” Juan Pablo said.

“And I was the one who brought up the idea of bringing them in from outside.”

In the late 1990s, Pone and her husband decided to return to the United State to work in retail sales for the family business, Pinto Foods.

“We worked there for nine years, and one of the problems was we didn’t know how to sell food,” Pone said.

At the time, Puerto Rico was a predominantly white island nation.

The island’s economy was struggling, and unemployment had reached nearly 20 percent.

“It was a very different time, with no electricity and no water, and a lot of people who had jobs,” Poner said.

“You were in your own little bubble of your own city,” she continued.

“It was very hard for people who weren’t as lucky as we were to get a job, and we were really lucky because we had a lot going for us.”

But as a Hispanic woman, I was not treated as well as the white women,” she added.

Pone’s husband and her daughter moved to the city, and they lived in an apartment with their daughter, who is now in high school.

She said that while she was working, she became aware that there were “black people working in the restaurant industry who were treated like second class citizens.”

The Ponce family was living in a housing project when they heard about the new mayor’s plan to improve Puerto Rico’s economy.”

He was trying to solve the problems that we had,” Pote said.

In May 2017, Pote was invited to a private event to discuss her ideas for improving Puerto Rico.

She told ABC that while some people were interested in the plan, she and her family were “not at all.””

Ponce said she was impressed with the progress Puerto Rico had made, but that her family “had a little bit of resistance.”””

But when I came to the table, they were like, ‘We already have a president and a cabinet.'”

Ponce said she was impressed with the progress Puerto Rico had made, but that her family “had a little bit of resistance.”

“The idea of people from Puerto Rico being able to go back and work, I think that’s very important,” she said.

While Puerto Rico has been recovering from the financial impact of the storm, many residents have struggled to find affordable housing.

Some families have been struggling to find permanent housing because they can’t afford the rent, according to the Associated Press.

The Associated Press reports that some of Puerto Rico, a U.S. territory, has experienced the most extreme housing crisis in the country.

In 2017, nearly 5,000 Puerto Ricans moved into federally subsidized housing, according the AP.

And in 2018, more than 4,000 people were displaced from their homes as a result of the hurricane.

“This is not an issue that you can simply walk into a room and say, ‘Hey, I’m here for you,'” Pone explained.

“This is a crisis that’s been going on for years.”

She added, “I feel that I’m one of many Puerto Ricos who have been waiting for this moment.”